I67.3: Progressive vascular leukoencephalopathy

Your brain is not getting enough blood. Your brain is getting damaged as a result.

Many blood vessels supply oxygen to the brain. Certain factors can damage the small blood vessels in the brain. These include, for example, high blood pressure, obesity and smoking. When fats and calcium are deposited in the vascular wall, the blood vessel can get narrower. Then sometimes not enough blood can flow through any longer. At the same time, the wall of the blood vessel may get weaker. In this way, small bleeds can occur in the brain. These circulatory disorders have damaged nerve fibers in your brain.

Various symptoms can appear over a period of time. For example, one’s memory may get worse or one might get confused more often. One may have problems with moving, or in carrying out certain activities.

Additional indicator

On medical documents, the ICD code is often appended by letters that indicate the diagnostic certainty or the affected side of the body.

  • G: Confirmed diagnosis
  • V: Tentative diagnosis
  • Z: Condition after
  • A: Excluded diagnosis

  • L: Left
  • R: Right
  • B: Both sides

Further information

Note

This information is not intended for self-diagnosis and does not replace professional medical advice from a doctor. If you find an ICD code on a personal medical document, please also note the diagnostic confidence indicator.
Your doctor will assist you with any health-related questions and explain the ICD code to you in a direct consultation if necessary.

Source

Provided by the non-profit organization “Was hab’ ich?” gemeinnützige GmbH on behalf of the Federal Ministry of Health (BMG).

Further articles

Vascular dementia

With vascular dementia, circulatory disorders in the brain lead to a reduction in mental abilities. It is the second most common type of dementia after Alzheimer’s disease.